Seminar intellektuaalomandi ja innovatsiooni teemal

4. septembril toimub Tallinnas põnev seminar:

Intellectual Property as a Tool to Enhance Innovation. Tallinn, 4 September 2013

Venue: Faculty of Law of the University of Tartu, Kaarli 3, 10119 Tallinn. Auditorium No.201

14.30-15.00    Registration

15.00   Opening of the seminar – Dr. Thomas Hoffmann, LL.M., DAAD-Lecturer in Law, Tartu University

Chair: Dr. Aleksei Kelli, Assoc. Prof. at Tartu University

15.05   Prof. Dr. Mary-Rose McGuire, Mannheim University:
The Function of IP in the Innovation Cycle: On the Purpose and Deficiencies of IP-law

16.00   Brett Makens, Economic and Commercial Officer, US Embassy
Cutting to the Chase: The Importance of IPR to Small Tech Hubs

16.30   Sofia Wagner, Mannheim University:
The dichotomy between patent law and trade secrets: The challenge to protect business information without undermining the patent system

17.00-17.30    Discussion

17.30   Conclusions – Aleksei Kelli and Thomas Hoffmann

The participation in the seminar is free of charge, but subject to registration.

Please register at airi.annama@ut.ee

 

Prof. Dr. Mary-Rose McGuire

Topic

The Function of IP in the Innovation Cycle: On the Purpose and Deficiencies of IP-law

Abstract

The concept of IP has been covered with scorching criticism. Whereas such criticism traditionally was based on external arguments, referring to fundamental freedoms or culture and society, currently IP is challenged also from both economists and the users of the system.

At the same time the broad news coverage of the so-called ‘smartphone-war’ has drawn the attention of the public to the deficiencies of the current system. Against this background the presentation aims to show that despite some problematic developments the IP-system is an indispensable building brick of the innovation cycle, but should not be overly broadened. Giving an overview on the possible justifications for our IP-system current deficiencies and possible alternatives, including the much bespoken concept of open innovation, will be discussed.

CV

Prof. Dr. Mary-Rose McGuire, M.Jur. (Göttingen) has graduated from Vienna School of Law (Austria) before she continued her legal education in Germany. Both in her Master and her Ph.D. at the University of Göttingen she focused on Civil Procedure and in particular Cross Border Litigation. Joining the Working Team of the Study Group on a European Civil Code at the University of Osnabrück she broadened her fields of research to include European Private Law and Intellectual Property Law. Her professoral thesis on license contracts was accepted by the University of Osnabrück in 2009. 2010 she was appointed a full professor at the University of Mannheim, where she holds a chair on private law, intellectual property law and European civil procedure. Her main fields of research inter alia include legal reform of IP-law, license contracts and cross border patent litigation.

Brett Makens

Topic

Cutting to the Chase: The Importance of IPR to Small Tech Hubs

Abstract

Thirteen percent of Estonia’s GDP is currently tied to the ICT sector with a goal to increase the percentage to over 16 percent by 2015. The successful expansion of the sector will depend upon many factors including innovators, an educated workforce, investors and ties to other start-up ecosystems in places like Boston and Silicon Valley. However, an equally important factor as Estonia competes with entrepreneurs from around the world is the need for an IPR system that both protects IP and promotes innovation. This speech will focus on why an IPR legal system should be considered a core element of any country looking to lead in innovation and why it is crucial for Estonia. Remarks will also touch on strategies for more positive engagement on IPR to gain a greater critical mass of support among entrepreneurs and the general public.

CV

Brett Makens is the Economic and Commercial Officer at the U.S. Embassy in Tallinn. He focuses much of his time on promoting ties between the start-up ecosystems in Estonia and the United States. Mr. Makens has also served at the U.S. embassies in Berlin and Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia. Prior to joining the U.S. diplomatic service, he worked for the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative as the Deputy Director for Industrial Market Access and was part of the negotiating team for the U.S.-Central America Free Trade Agreement while working for the State Department in Washington DC. Mr. Makens holds a BA from Michigan State University and a JD/MA from the University of Denver.

Sofia Wagner

Topic

The dichotomy between patent law and trade secrets: The challenge to protect business information without undermining the patent system

Abstract

Despite the fact that business secrets are protected against theft and misappropriation, there are many complaints that such protection is insufficient. In particular protection in business relations and employment contracts pose some difficulties. The same holds true for enforcement, which usually requires the litigant to prove the defendant’s ill intention. On the other hand strengthening trade law protection has to steer clear of conflicting with the patent system and its core concept of early disclosure. On the basis of the present situation in Germany and the US the presentation will focus on possible reform of trade secret protection.

CV

Sofia Wagner has graduated from the University of Bayreuth, where she already specialized in the area of IP-law. Since 2010 she is a research and teaching assistant at the University of Mannheim and has written her doctoral thesis on trade secret protection (know how) under German law.